Fun day at The Barley Mow in Newbold in memory of popular teenager Joe Spooner

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A FUN day is taking place in Newbold on Saturday in memory of a teenager who died after playing cricket.

The event takes place at The Barley Mow every year as a tribute to popular Rugby boy Joe Spooner, who lost his life aged just 15.

He never showed any signs of being ill and his death in 2005 was put down to Sudden Adult Death Syndrome.

The event starts at 3pm until late and includes circus workshop, bouncy castle, face-painting, barbecue, live music, charity autction, raffle and disco.

Joe’s father, Stephen, said; “Everyone is welcome to the event and we hope to raise around £1,000 for the Sudden Adult Death Syndrome charity.”

Raffle prizes include an XBox 360, Nintendo DS XL, Acer Notebook, Fuji digital camera, Sony Errickson mobile phone a £50 Tesco voucher.

The fun day will help fund life-saving cardiac equipment.

A child, young person or adult under 65 may be at risk from sudden cardiac death due to an underlying heart condition.

He or she will appear healthy and, in many cases, you will have absolutely no idea that something might be wrong.

With knowledge of the signs, symptoms and genetic implications, these heart conditions can be diagnosed and treated appropriately.

SADS UK has information about the ‘warning signs’ as heart conditions can affect all age groups, even children.

If a heart condition is identified it can be treated.

Joe has been described by friends and family as ‘bright, kind and always wearing a smile.’

They say everything he did, he did with 100% effort and made all his friends and family very proud.

If you would like to know more about the charity and the work done to save lives please contact Anne Jolly on 01277 811215, e-mail info@sadsuk.org, or visit www.sadsuk.org.

SADS UK would like to thank all of Joe’s family and friends who work so tirelessly to raise awareness and funds

Defibrillators have been and continue to be placed in the community in Joe’s memory to save lives.