Neighbours rally against ‘catastrophic’ housing plans in Hillmorton

Concerned residents Charlotte Dickens, Paul Dickens, Catherine Dickens, Jenny Noel and Sheebee, and Amelia Dickens
Concerned residents Charlotte Dickens, Paul Dickens, Catherine Dickens, Jenny Noel and Sheebee, and Amelia Dickens

Concerned residents fear plans for new houses in their quiet road could have a ‘catastrophic’ impact on wildlife found in their gardens.

Neighbours on Stanley Road near Hillmorton are concerned that plans to build five properties across two large backgardens will increase the amount of traffic and severely impact on the wildlife.

Plans to build two bungalows on the site were rejected around ten years ago.

Catherine Dickens, who lives on Stanley Road, said she was concerned about the lack of privacy in her garden if the plans went ahead.

“The people on this road bought their houses because of the spacious gardens and lovely wildlife,” she said.

“We have bats, foxes, newts, all kinds of birds and we are very concerned that a building site and eventual new properties with vehicles will have a catastrophic affect on this.

“Also, this is a main route for students walking to Ashlawn School and, if the houses go ahead, the road would be a very secluded entrance and this could put young people at risk, as well as those with sight problems.”

More than 100 people have signed a petition against the development.

The planning application states that the ecological loss would be ‘relatively minimal’.

“On a site such as this, where the vast majority of the land available has been gardens, the ecological loss due to development is relatively minimal.

“However the hedge-lines and trees will be retained where possible and benefit extant ecology together with the inclusion of future planting which will be based on a theme of native species in order to maximise the biodiversity of the site into the future with the associated increase in invertebrates reliant upon native species and benefits higher up the food chain right through to top predators such as birds of prey.”

Rugby Borough Councillors Cllr Jerry Roodhouse and Cllr Noreen New visited the site last weekend.

They will meet with planning officers to discuss the application this week.

Resident Jenny Noel said: “Once these gardens are gone they’re gone. What one generation enjoyed will be permanently lost to the next with the consequent and usual loss of privacy, overshadowing, noise, disturbance, parking and traffic problems whilst depriving nature of its home.

“The impact of this has not been considered carefully enough by our decision-makers.

“This isn’t inner London - it’s Rugby!”