Pawprints Dog Rescue opens Rugby charity shop

The ribbon is cut
The ribbon is cut

Volunteers, residents and the Mayor of Rugby celebrated the grand opening of Pawprints Dog Rescue's shop on Tuesday (September 12) morning.

Pawprints founder and trustee Anita Twigger said the shop has been set up in the hope it can ensure a more steady income for the charity, which relies on donations and fundraising to operate.

(Left to right) Mayor Belinda Garcia, Trisha Shaw and Anita Twigger

(Left to right) Mayor Belinda Garcia, Trisha Shaw and Anita Twigger

Mayor Belinda Garcia cut the ribbon to mark the official opening of Albert Street shop, located on the former premises of Vanilla.

She said: “I am very pleased to see the charity shop opening, especially in Rugby.

“Nothing like this would ever work without all the volunteers who are willing to give their time.

“If anything goes wrong with your health over the years it’s nice to think there are charities like Pawprints that will look after any pets.”

Celebrations in the stockroom

Celebrations in the stockroom

Mrs Twigger said: “It’s incredible. We’ve had so many donations we haven’t had to do any collections.”

She said the shop opened a few months ago, but the group wanted a grand opening to make it official and raise awareness.

Mrs Twigger commended the efforts of all volunteers and thanked the public for their support.

She was keen to thank Pawprints trustee and volunteer Trisha Shaw for her extensive commitment to the charity in spite of her ongoing struggle with breast cancer.

The shop is opened

The shop is opened

Mrs Twigger said, despite the fact she is undergoing chemotherapy, Mrs Shaw was in the shop the day before the opening from early in the morning to late at night helping to make preparations.

Mrs Shaw, who recently raised over £2,300 for the charity in a sponsored head shave, said: “We are really pleased to be able to open a Pawprints shop in our home town.”

She said she is looking forward to the charity being able to help more dogs as it becomes more financially stable.

Pawprints grew out of a Facebook group which aimed to assist in finding lost dogs.

Five years ago it became a charity which rescues stray dogs from being destroyed and since then it has grown to be over 70 volunteers strong.

Mrs Twigger estimates the charity has saved over 1300 dogs since its inception - with the yearly number of rescued dogs consistently going up.