Singing man given community order after making sexual advances towards a woman in Rugby town centre

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A MAN who made sexual advances towards - and repeatedly kissed - a woman in the street in Rugby has been given a community sentence.

Magistrates heard the woman was outside a surveyor’s office in Albert Street. When she went to a ticket machine, she became aware of Andrew William Pollock who was over the road, singing.

“He told her ‘You’re beautiful, you’re gorgeous’ and began to sing between these comments,” said prosecutor Naila Iqbal.

“He was coming towards her and put his left arm around her shoulder. He put both arms around her body and tried to kiss her face.

“The women said he had her in a ‘lock’ and started kissing her in the face six or seven times in quick succession.”

Miss Iqbal said the woman said Pollock “appeared to seek some sexual gratification of some sort” by his actions. She went into the surveyor’s office to get away from his unwanted attention.

She said she “felt violated and disgusted” by what happened and wanted to make a formal complaint regarding Pollock “forcing himself on me in a sexual manner”.

The woman received a red mark on her back.

Seventy-three-year-old Pollock told police he had been singing in the street and put his arms around the woman.

“He denied slapping her back and her bottom at any stage,” added Miss Iqbal.

He said he had been hugged while singing two or three times previously.

Pollock appeared before Nuneaton magistrates yesterday (Tuesday) and admitted intentionally touching a woman aged over 16 in a sexual manner on October 11 last year.

He had initially entered a not guilty plea. The case was due for trial.

Miss Iqbal said Pollock was given a community order by Leamington magistrates last August for three offences of common assault on 15-year-old girls.

In one incident, he slapped and grabbed a girl’s bottom when she was on a bus with a friend.

The other girls’ bottoms were slapped when they were in Railway Terrace, Rugby, where Pollock was singing loudly. He was picked out during an identification parade.

Neil Skinner, mitigating, said it was “very rare for someone to wait until they are 73 years old before they receive their first community order”.

“Mr Pollock has said himself ‘This has got to stop – there will be no more of that.’ He wants to extend his apology to the victim and to the court.”

While the bench were deliberating, Pollock said in open court: “It will stop. No more of it, no more. I apologise.”

Magistrates decided to revoke the existing community order and re-sentenced Pollock to a new two-year community order, with supervision, and ordered him to sign on the sex offenders’ register for five years.

He was told to pay £200 prosecution costs.

Pollock repeated from the dock: “I will never appear in court again. It will stop. No more of it.

“No more court, no more of it. Finished, finished for good.”

The prosecutor asked for Pollock to be made subject to a Criminal Anti-Social Behaviour Order (CRASBO) but the bench decided to adjourn consideration of the application until a date in mid-February.