Sticky mess from the skies: was Rugby motorist a witness to strange natural phenomenon or a more earthly misdeed?

Gloria McLaughlin was driving home in the early hours of Saturday morning, when her car windscreen was hit by something strange.
Gloria McLaughlin was driving home in the early hours of Saturday morning, when her car windscreen was hit by something strange.

Gloria McLaughlin found herself pondering the far reaches of outer space when her car was splattered with slime.

Mrs McLaughlin, who lives in Newbold, was waiting at the traffic lights at Butler’s Leap at around midnight last Saturday when a gooey liquid hit the windscreen of her R-Class Mercedes.

Gloria McLaughlin was driving home in the early hours of Saturday morning, when her car windscreen was hit by something strange.

Gloria McLaughlin was driving home in the early hours of Saturday morning, when her car windscreen was hit by something strange.

The mystery deepened when she discovered a Russian probe was breaking up high in the sky over Britain. Might it have been to blame, she wondered?

Mrs McLaughlin said: “When the substance hit the windscreen it made a tremendous noise – almost like a gunshot. My husband and I were startled and pulled away from the lights as we had no idea what it was and just wanted to get home safely.

“We had a look at it when we got home and it was a strange, blue-tinted sticky substance. We were baffled as to where it could have come from.”

Several egg-throwing incidents have been reported in Rugby of late, but neither the McLaughlins nor Advertiser photographer Mike Baker thought that could be the explanation.

Mrs McLaughlin added: “When I got home and rang my cousin he told me not to touch it in case it reacted with my skin, but by that point it was too late, so I washed my hands and haven’t tried to wash it off since.

“I’m not sure if the car is damaged and I will only find out what effect it’s had on the paintwork when it comes to washing it off.

“The morning after I heard on the news about the Russian satellite and apparently falling debris could have hit the south of England.

“I’d like to know if anyone else in the area experienced anything similar over the weekend.”

The Phobos-Grunt satellite was to travel to one of Mars’s moons to collect soil samples. But its booster rockets failed to fire, causing it to start orbiting the Earth and slowly descend. The main body of the 13-tonne satellite eventually ended up falling in the south Pacific on Sunday. The mystery remains unsolved.