Work on Rugby’s gyratory system comes to an end

Rugby gyratory
Rugby gyratory
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The major £1.5 million revamp of the Rugby gyratory system has ‘gone well’ according to the county council – despite being two weeks over schedule.

The work, which started on January 5, aimed to 
ease congestion in the town and make the roads 
safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

Rugby gyratory

Rugby gyratory

Warwickshire County Council said the resurfacing was the ‘critical element’ in the works and it was finished just ahead of schedule.

Contractor Geoffrey Osborne, which has an office in Corporation Street, Rugby, carried out the work.

The engineering work is expected to be completed this week, meaning the overall job will finish two weeks after the planned date.

A Warwickshire County Council spokesman said: “Work on the gyratory on the whole has gone well considering what a difficult site it is.

Rugby gyratory

Rugby gyratory

“The expectation before work started was for 
more problems, more traffic delays and more complaints than we’ve actually had.

“It hasn’t all gone to schedule, though the critical element, the carriageway resurfacing, started on the planned date and finished just before the original planned finish date.”

Rugby resident Catherine Haworth said the work had been carried out well.

“I use the gyratory every day and did not experience 
any delays.

Rugby gyratory

Rugby gyratory

“I think it looks great and will run a lot smoother - well done to all the workers,” she said.

The work is expected to be completed within the set budget, which is around £1.5 million.

Traffic signals with pedestrian and cyclist crossing facilities have been installed on Dunchurch Road, Russelsheim Way and Bilton Road.

Speaking of the new road system, reader Darryl Barnes said: “It seems to be that nobody gives way on there coming from Rugby School way, they carry on as it was before, and I very nearly got knocked off my motorbike.”

Rugby gyratory

Rugby gyratory

After the public showed disapproval of pedestrianising parts of North Street and Church Street in December 2013, the county council spent the money on improving the gyratory system to make sure the town was ready for the new housing developments and the additional traffic they bring.

The authority hopes the improved system will reduce congestion in the town and said the contractor tried to keep disruption to a minimum during the resurfacing.

“The contract stipulated restricted working hours to avoid disruption during the peak periods and this has worked really well,” the county council spokesman said.

“There were a few days when material supply problems caused over-runs twice into the night, but for the most part, peak hour delays were minimised.

“There were also two night time surfacing phases to enable us to complete the particularly tricky sections on Corporation Street, Lawford Road and part of Warwick Street.”

But Katie Treacy, who also uses the gyratory, said people were unsure how to use the new system.

Rugby gyratory

Rugby gyratory

“If the last few days driving are anything to go by, there will be people smashing into each other very shortly. I’ve been cut up numerous times as people just don’t see how to use the new lanes. And there are way too may traffic lights, it will be stop start, stop start, in my opinion but time will tell,” she said.