From the Advertiser archives - March 15, 2018 edition

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In the news 100, 50 and 25 years ago

March 16, 1918

We should like to take this opportunity of thanking our readers for the generous way in which they received the suggestion of sharing copies of the Advertiser with their friends. It may be useful to remind all concerned that the object of the drastic reduction of paper supplies by the Government is to limit the importation of pulp and other materials from which newspaper is made, in order to release shipping for the conveyancing of food to our shores and other purposes vital to the carrying on of the war.

# Our 1918 archive continues to explain the restrictions the Advertiser was facing: “Our sincere apologies at so much space in our last issue being taken up by advertisements and official notices. The change we had to make came upon us so suddenly that we had no time to rearrange our advertising contracts, but we are now taking steps to ration the space allotted to this class of matter.

It should not, however, be forgotten that a medium like the Advertiser for making one’s public announcements is of national importance to the commercial and social life of the community. Advertisements are generally read with interest but our readers may feel assured that all important happenings in the town will duly be recorded as heretofore.”

March 15, 1968

A woman living a life of loneliness and fear in the midst of more than 30 empty, condemned houses returned to her home in Sun Street last Friday to find it had been bombarded with bricks and stones. Mrs Wright’s neighbours have been rehoused since most of the houses in the street were acquired under a compulsory purchase order. Rugby Borough Council have made Mrs Wright one offer of alternative accommodation but it was unsuitable and said there was nothing to do until something else was available.

March 11, 1993

Staging a new play that is likely to end up in the Guinness Book of Records are Rugby Theatre members. Every two years BT sponsors a leading playwright to write an original play to be performed by amateur groups. This time it’s Shakespeare Country, a new play by Peter Whelan. The world premier will take place simultaneously on October 16 at 70 theatres, including Henry Street, which will be a world record for a first night.